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McGintys Log Cabin – (all rights to this story are the property of Richard Grace CH4 8LB Bracken 01244 679503)



Series of children's books – for parents to read to children – if they dare! this is a sort of autobiography inspired by my grandchildren and the feeling that TV, video and computer games will never replace personal contact
Mcgintys Log Cabin - is the name of the book and here is the first chapter - looking for illustrator

When Congo stepped down from the bullet train his head was full of thoughts about McGinty. His search for answers was soon to be fulfilled in an extraordinary way.

Doolittle had worked with McGinty for some years and had kept in touch as a friend. Doolittle is a lovely dog really the only problem is when he gets a bone you can't get it off him. Congo told Doolittle about his long search for answers to questions that had puzzled him throughout school and university. It was time for Congo to launch out on the wide world and was about to make some of his most important decisions.

Congo was excited to be given a ten minute appointment at McGintys log cabin with McGinty himself and had arrived early. The sun was shining and Congo rifled through his bag to check the things Doolittles told him to pack. He also checked directions and his own notes with his “mobile communicator” (Emcee).

On the way from the train Congo swung through trees making rapid progress and always watching behind to make sure he wasn’t being followed. Doolittle had stressed that the visit must remain a secret. McGinty was a very busy Goat and would be upset if other Rang-Tangs would find out about his cabin.

Congo packed his things carefully in the waterproof bag bought for the last leg of his journey and jumped into the river making for the bank on the other side. Not long now before McGintys log cabin would come into sight.

As Congo rounded the rock face he could see the rope bridge re-crossing the river and McGintys log cabin came into view. Doolittles instructions were perfect and Congo re-checked his list of questions using Emcee

The river was running fast at this point and swimming would be impossible so the bridge was the only way to approach.

Congo remembered Doolittles instructions about turning up on time, checked and looked for any incoming messages on Emcee for the final time before the meeting. 30 minutes early with his journey nearly over Congo could feel his heart pounding and felt both excited and apprehensive about the meeting. Doolittle was certainly an extraordinary dog and for sure Congo was in for an important meeting.

The time had come and Congo crossed the bridge he could see McGinty the goat sitting in his rocking chair on the log cabin veranda. The cabin was built from whole trees and had a grass roof and a metal chimney with smoke rising into the forest. Congo remembered the amount of time available and resolved not to waste any.

Good morning young Rang-Tang said McGinty stretching out his front right hoof. Sit here I have a drink of tea for you ready. I do hope Doolittle explained about the ten minute rule and that you have your three questions only ready, so go ahead now – in the future you will learn the importance of time.

Yes of course said Congo my father has given me a thousand Rang-Roes on completing my studies, this is enough money to pay for an extra two years at university, a rang-mobile transport system or a backpacking trip around the world – what should I do?

McGinty sipped his tea through a straw took a deep breath and said – “Congo you are a lucky young Rang-Tang but you will also need tenacity, endeavor and good friends. Time is important so go ahead with your second question now.

Tapping furiously on his Emcee keypad so as not to loose any advice Congo blurted out his second question – McGinty why do Rang-Tangs have to leave home and start their own family when training is over?

Congo your training is never over – Doolittle should have told you this and now you are wasting my time, give me your third and final question and finish your tea.

McGinty how important is happiness?

Excellent question Congo - no-one seems to know the real answer to this so I will arrange an appointment for you with Algy the shark and Harris the squirrel you will receive instructions on Emcee. When you have met them and thought about their advice ask Doolittle to sort out another visit here to let me know what you have decided - in ten minutes only of course.

Go now and take care there are snakes in the forest and crocodiles in the river, your time is up Digby the pig is due for my next appointment in five minutes and I need to speak with Doolittle before Digby arrives.

As Congo swung through the trees on his way back to the train he felt relieved that the meeting was over and that the next two meetings would help to clarify his decisions. McGinty was certainly an interesting Goat and his reputation was good so the meetings with Algy and Harris were of utmost importance.

On the far side of the River Congo sat to contemplate the Journey ahead, the questions in his head were banging on the inside of his scull. Crocky popped his head out of the water said “Congo watch out for sharks” and disappeared as quickly as he arrived. Congos head was so full of questions he was not sure at all what the answers and advice meant.

He arrived home safely checked Emcee and settled down for the night. Tossing and turning Congo kept thinking about the message he had received from McGinty “Congo before your next visit keep me in touch with progress – three messages only maximum of nine words each Good luck! McGinty.

second chapter overview

In the next chapter Congo talks with Doolitle and realises that to find Algy and Harris he must work at least for a short while as a service junior at a printing business. To do this he would need to get through an interview and get some form of transport.

Congo buys two wheel transport and falls off it on the way to interview – he has the tenacity to continue and gets the job. (a significant life changing moment)

Harris owned the business and Algy was a salesman working for Harris.

Algy advises Congo to have a good time whilst he is still young and free. Harris teaches him two lessons. (honesty is not always rewarded and your most respected bosses do not always tell the truth) Congo finds the business dis-organised and the employees are predominantly selfish and downright lazy, it could all be so much more fun and better for all including the owners. Congo makes friends with Kevin who cleans the bosses car with a small paintbrush and gets the sack for low productivity. (there is an important connection coming up soon)

He returns to the log cabin to explain that he has decided to go traveling but McGinty advises him to stay and put right the problems. He tells McGinty that he has read that in other lands happiness is provided by the governing group and everyone is equal.

Stay here - Travel will be the result but money will remain in the bank because soon it would be needed to build a shelter and look after two young Rang-Tangs if it was true that Brina was on the scene for good. Congo had met Brina at university and had not seen her for years but had bumped into her whilst out with Algy and had fallen in love.

Congo returns to work and a mass of things start happening.

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